PUPPY SHOT SCHEDULE

Puppy's Shot Schedule Age

Recommended Vaccinations
     Every 3-4 weeks in between doses

6 - 8 weeks

  • DHPP (vaccines for distemper, adenovirus [hepatitis], parainfluenza, and parvovirus)

  • Deworming

10 - 12 weeks

  • DHPP (vaccines for distemper, adenovirus [hepatitis], parainfluenza and parvovirus)

  • Deworming

14-16 weeks

  • DHPP (vaccines for distemper, adenovirus [hepatitis], parainfluenza and parvovirus)

  • Bordatella

16 weeks

  • Rabies

  • DHPP (vaccines for distemper, adenovirus [hepatitis], parainfluenza and parvovirus)

(4th DA2PPV if started at 6 weeks)


**Microchips can be inserted anytime after the pet is over 2 lbs.**

DOG VACCINES

Rabies Vaccine: Is a vaccine used to prevent rabies. Vaccinating dogs and cats is very effective in preventing the spread of rabies to other pets and humans. The Rabies Vaccine should be given NO sooner than 12 weeks of age in a puppy. Most Veterinarians Recommend the first shot to be given after the puppy is 16 weeks of age.

 

DA2PPV Vaccine: Canine 1-DAPPv vaccine is a modified live virus vaccine for the vaccination of healthy dogs as an aid in the prevention of disease caused by canine distemper virus, adenovirus type 1 (hepatitis) and adenovirus type 2 (respiratory disease), canine parainfluenza virus and canine parvovirus.

 

Bordetella Vaccine: If your pet is a regular at Daycare, grooming facilities or the dog park, those shots every 6 to 12 months to prevent canine infectious tracheobronchitis (aka Kennel Cough). Bordetella is highly contagious, easily transmitted through the air or direct contact, and resistant to destruction in the environment.

 

Rattlesnake Vaccine: Any dog over four months of age that is exposed to rattlesnakes whether, at home walking, hiking, camping, hunting, or elsewhere might be a good candidate for rattlesnake vaccine. A dog should get at least two doses about 30 days apart in the initial vaccination sequence. After the initial 2 doses, your pet should be given the vaccine yearly.

 

Heartworm Preventative: Heartworms are transmitted by mosquitoes. Tiny heartworm larvae, called microfilaria, circulate in the blood, and are sucked up by the bug when it feeds on an infected host animal; for heartworms, their natural host is the dog. Treatment of a mature heartworm infection can be very dangerous. When the arsenic-based drug is given to an infected dog, the massive die-off of the worms can cause severe inflammation and even respiratory failure. Not all dogs survive treatment.
Clearly, prevention is the best option!

Alternatively, many veterinarians advocate simply giving the regular heartworm preventative to kill off any microfilaria already present and keep newly deposited larvae from developing, while waiting for the adult worms to die. 

 

Deworming:  All puppies and kittens starting at 6 weeks of age should be given a dewormer for prevented illness caused by parasites. Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms and whipworms are common among young puppies and kittens and are easily treated.
 

Leptospirosis:  Infection mainly occurs in subtropical, tropical, and wet environments, which have stagnant surface water and are frequented by wildlife. Heavily irrigated pastures are also common sources of infection. Dogs will typically higher risks of contracting Leptospira that come into contact with infected water, soil, or mud, while swimming, passing through, or drinking contaminated water, it comes from contact with urine from an infected animal. Dogs that live on or near farms are at an increased risk of acquiring this bacteria. Also at increased risk are dogs that have spent time in a kennel, around lakes, the woods and dog park.

CAT VACCINES

Rabies Vaccine: Is a vaccine used to prevent rabies. Vaccinating dogs and cats is very effective in preventing the spread of rabies to other pets and humans. The Rabies Vaccine should be given NO sooner than 12 weeks of age in a kitten. Most Veterinarians Recommend the first shot to be given after the kitten is 16 weeks of age.

 

1-HCPCh Vaccine: Feline 1-HCPCh vaccine is a modified live virus and chlamydia vaccine for the vaccination of healthy cats as an aid in the prevention of disease caused by feline rhinotracheitis, calici, and panleukopenia viruses and Chlamydia psittaci.

 

FeLV Vaccine: Contrary to what its name implies, feline leukemia (abbreviated as FeLV or sometimes referred to as “Feleuk”) is not a blood cancer – although it can cause cancer affecting the blood. Instead, it is a viral infection that can set up shop anywhere in a cat’s body. Once a cat contracts the virus, it cannot be cured, but keeping a cat current on his vaccinations will prevent disease associated with FeLV. Though it is not a core vaccine, it is recommended for cats at risk for exposure to this dangerous disease.


Deworming:  All puppies and kittens starting at 6 weeks of age should be given a dewormer for prevented illness caused by parasites. Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whipworms are common among young puppies and kittens and are easily treated.